The War of the Cappuccinos.

February 2, 2018

 

 

Sounds like a spoofy horror/thriller movie, doesn't it? 

 

Haha - no, I'm talking about what is a huge differentiation between the 'cappuccinos', especially when you look at them between the major chains next ot the speciality shops. 

 

This is largely due to the chains being inspired from an Italian heritage, where the cappuccino is a very frothy drink to be enjoyed in the morning. Speciality, instead, focuses more on the texturing of milk in a way which a) produces aesthetically pleasing latte art, and b) mixes as efficiently as possible with the espresso to make a smoother and silkier beverage.

 

But hey, I can't even bring myself to choose - I love both versions of a cappuccino, to be honest, quite equally. Well, as long as there isn't chocolate on it. Oh I know right, alert the press right? I'm one of the only people out there I'm guessing who doesn't actually enjoy chocolate on the cappuccino. This is mainly due to the fact that I just get overly self conscious over the fact that I think I'm going to leave the shop with a face full of chocolate dust - milk chocolate sprinkles on top can actually be quite delicious. It's just not worth that blunder for me! But heck, here's a short recap of the two types below:

 

The 'Traditional' Foamy Cappuccino

Some speciality coffee shops still label these in the shop, and differentiate this from the regular cappuccino by calling it the 'traditional' instead. From one I've noticed, this causes more confusion than just missing it entirely off the menu, as everyone begins to suffer from an existential crisis at the propect of having more than one version of a cappuccino out there. 

 

These are usually found in the large chains, where Italian heritage is prominent - and also in small Italian eateries where, yep, you guessed it - Italian heritage is also prominent. The level of 'dryness' (how frothy it is) does still vary quite dramatically between servings in different shops, which can make ordering a cappuccinos in these places quite the trial-and-error. 

 

The 'Speciality' Cappuccino

To be honest, not much different to the latte. Many baristas don't even steam the milk to a different texture, but if they do it's only a tiny bit thicker so latte art is still fully able to be done. What I say differentiates this from the latte in most coffee shops is because of two things. Firstly, the cappuccino seems to, for the most part, be served in ceramic mug, unlike the glass which the similar 'latte' comes in. The other differentiation is the fact that cappuccinos can, and usually do, for the most part, have cocoa sprinkled into the crema, creating this cute 'speckled' effect through the drink when served. As much as I do find this pretty, I've found that 9 times out of 10 the cocoa used is far too bitter for me, and makes the overall mouth feel of the coffee so dry, it makes the experience uncomfortable. 

 

Which type of cappuccino is your favourite? And do you take chocolate on top or no chocolate? Keep me posted!

 

Until next time, lovelies. x

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Please reload